Getting Fit in the French Quarter

get-fit-french-quarter

New Orleans may be the city that care forgot but that doesn’t mean it has to be the city where your fitness regime is forgotten, too. Admittedly, it’s not always easy to stay disciplined, especially on vacation. Between beignets, jambalaya, eggs Benedict and bourbon milk punch, the Crescent City offers many delicious ways to fall off the wagon, diet-wise. But what most people don’t know is that the French Quarter also is host to several fantastic gyms, running paths and group exercise classes. If all else fails, just walking the Vieux Carré’s slate-paved sidewalks is a great way to plow through calories — strap on a pedometer and watch the steps add up alongside your sightseeing.

Craving a more intense burn? Here are some fantastic workouts that’ll take you into the vibrant, bustling heart of the French Quarter itself.

Running the Riverwalk

More than 16 million gallons of water roll down the mighty Mississippi River every minute — and with this sunny riverside run you’ll be getting in the flow right alongside them. The paved route is six blocks from Prince Conti Hotel’s front door. Looking for an energizing two-mile route? Make a right when you hit the river, jog through scenic Woldenberg Park until you approach the Aquarium of the Americas, then double back and run to the opposite end of the Moonwalk (a paved path named for former mayor Moon Landrieu).

For a more challenging, 5.5 mile route, tack on a jaunt down Crescent Park. You’ll exit the Moonwalk, make a right on Decatur Street, follow it to Esplanade Avenue, turn right on Esplanade, and follow the signs to a beautiful 1.4-mile linear park connecting the Bywater, Marigny and French Quarter. Run to the end and back, and by the time you return to your room, you’ll have racked up almost a 10K.

P.S. Forget to pack your sneakers? The Outlet Collection at Riverwalk, where you can snag a pair of discount designer running shoes, just steps away from this path.

New Orleans Athletic Club

A local staple since 1872, frequented by stars ranging from Tennessee Williams to Clark Gable, this opulent gym is worth a visit even if all you do is splash in the pool. (Where else will you find chandeliers, ballrooms, a library, and a full bar alongside top-of-the-line fitness equipment and weights?) The daily drop-in rate is $20 and includes admission to yoga and group exercise classes. Just bring your driver’s license and hotel room key to register.

The Sweat Social

For many, high-energy group exercise classes are a great motivator. (You’re not going to phone in your workout when an instructor is right there demanding more reps, right?) The Sweat Social is a group exercise class geared toward travelers, offering yoga, high-intensity interval training, mat Pilates, bodyweight strength exercises, kickboxing, and many other workouts for people of all fitness levels. Best of all, instructors encourage participants to mingle with team-building exercises, icebreakers, and raffles — so who knows, you might find a new drinking buddy to grab cocktails with after class. Scheduled on demand, classes are held in central locations in the French Quarter. Pricing varies depending on the type of class and group size.

Yoga at the Cabildo

This elegant building housed the Spanish colonial building in the 1700s, and now it’s a venue for yoga classes (also, a museum). For a double-dose of history and fitness all under one French mansard roof, check out Yoga at the Cabildo. Appropriate for all practice levels, classes take place in a sunny, high-ceilinged room overlooking Jackson Square from 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. They are $15 or $10 for Friends of the Cabildo members.

Prince Conti Hotel’s Guide to Summer in the French Quarter

New Orleans is home to many delicious restaurants, famous landmarks, exciting festivals, rich history, and unique entertainment for all ages. It doesn’t come as a surprise that people travel from all over to New Orleans to experience its unique local flavor. Summer is a good time to visit despite the soaring temps, as the city’s party schedule is jam-packed with festivals and other events unique to New Orleans, and there are fewer crowds than, say, during Mardi Gras, Jazz Fest, or the cooler months in general.

Take Advantage of the Summer Deals

Plus, the city’s local restaurants and cultural destinations sweeten the deal by the citywide promotions like the Museum Month or COOLinary, both in August, when you can visit a number of local museums for the price of the annual membership for just one of them, or have a three-course dinner in a top restaurant for as little as $39. The one-time admission fee to some local museums can run over $20, so this is a great opportunity to explore on the budget. The fees for the smaller museums are probably the best deal, ranging from $30 to $35 annually. (You can buy a membership upon arrival.)

With COOLinary, there’s no better time to try out an award-winning restaurant during your visit, or revisit an old favorite. For the month of August, this dining program offers discounted dining deals at participating restaurants located all over the city. Over 100 of participating local restaurants run the gamut from the iconic to the smaller, more casual ones.

The extraordinary summer dining deals don’t end with COOLinary in August. Behold the Restaurant Week (September 9-15), with more and more restaurants participating every year. For one week in September, dozens of local restaurants will be dishing out prix fixe lunches, brunches and dinners — averaging at $20 for lunch and not exceeding $39 for brunch and dinner. Just like COOLinary, Restaurant Week is a citywide promotion designed to lure diners, both local and visiting, to increase patronage at restaurants across the city. Cross an iconic white-tablecloth establishment off your bucket list, or discover a new fave in the neighborhood!

Family-Friendly New Orleans

New Orleans is more than a romp on Bourbon Street (though we recommend that too). There is entertainment for people of all ages all year round, but, with fewer people out on the streets, you can really take the time to explore the city at your own pace in the summer. Bring your family to the Aquarium of the Americas, or the incredible World War II Museum. Grab a warm and fresh beignet at the famous Café Du Monde, or go shopping at the Riverwalk outlet mall or the French Market open-air mall, where you will find a flea market, local arts and crafts, and edible souvenirs like pralines and every kind of hot sauce under the sun. Want something special to bring home as a gift? Check out our top recommendations for the unique New Orleans gifts you can get near the Prince Conti Hotel.

Then, of course, there are the stunning St. Louis Cathedral and Jackson Square to explore, plus dozens of other important landmarks, all located within walking distance in the historic French Quarter. Both the Presbytère and the Cabildo that flank the cathedral have excellent museums worth exploring by the whole family.

A convenient way to check out countless New Orleans attractions is on the City Sightseeing double-decker tour bus. With a pickup location at Basin Street Station, close to the hotel, the City Sightseeing tour is very flexible and allows you to see many famous destinations in the city at your own pace by hopping on and hopping off the bus whenever you desire. This system allows you to stay as long as you would like at each destination, since a bus comes every 30 minutes and runs seven days a week for your convenience.

Another option is to take your family on a historic cruise to Chalmette battlefield, on the Creole Queen. This beautiful paddlewheeler also offers dinner jazz cruiser that will keep you cool and entertained.

So Many Festivals and Celebrations

This year’s Independence Day weekend is shaping up to be spectacular as usual, filled with special events, fireworks, and — this being New Orleans — great food and music. Kick off the festivities with Go 4th on the River celebration, a free Dueling Barges fireworks show over the Mississippi River at the Riverfront.

Gear up for the best in R&B, hip-hop, jazz, and blues with ESSENCE Festival (July 5-7), held at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome and the Convention Center. Beyond the concerts held each night of the fest at the Superdome, the free daytime activities at the Convention Center include motivational seminars, beauty and style presentations, celebrity interviews, cooking demonstrations with top chefs, and lots more. The always-impressive music lineup this year includes Brandy, Missy Elliott, Mary J. Blige, Nas, Pharrell Williams, Timbaland, and more. Former First Lady and best-selling author Michelle Obama will make an appearance too, her first at the fest, to discuss her recently published memoir.

Running of the Bulls brings Encierro to New Orleans on July 12-14, except the bulls are the Big Easy Rollergirls. San Fermin in Nueva Orleans pays annual homage to the world-famous Encierro of Pamplona, Spain, running through the CBD starting at the Sugar Mill.

Celebrate the French National Day in America’s most French city during the annual Bastille Day Fête at the New Orleans Museum of Art (June 12-14), and at the block party on Saturday, July 13 in the 3100 block of Ponce de Leon Street in the city’s historic Faubourg St. John neighborhood, adjacent to Esplanade Avenue. Live music and kid-friendly events abound, while dozens of local vendors present their food and drinks, many with a French flavor.

Some of the best restaurants and bars in town celebrate Tales of the Cocktail on July 16-21. Since 2002 the festival has grown from an annual walking tour of historic New Orleans cocktail bars into a series of dinners, tastings, seminars, and more. This year will be its 17th, with Royal Sonesta as the new hotel host and the Highball as the official festival drink. Expect over 300 events crammed into six days, including the always-popular “best of” Spirited Awards and many cocktail-themed parties.

Satchmo SummerFest (August 2-4), named so after one of Louis Armstrong’s nicknames, started as a tribute in 2001, on Armstrong’s 100th birthday. It has been traditionally held on the first week of August and marked by strong attendance. The three-day festival is held at the New Orleans Jazz Museum at the Old U.S. Mint at the foot of Esplanade Avenue., and will have music all weekend on its two outdoor, tented stages. Other events will include a Sunday morning Jazz Mass at the historic St. Augustine Church in Tremé, seminars and film screenings, kid’s activities, and a second-line parade.

Browse the galleries on the White Linen Night on Saturday, August 3 (or its cheeky cousin, the Dirty Linen Night). In its 25th year, White Linen Night is a block party and an open house for galleries on the 300-700 blocks of Julia Street in the Warehouse District, with three stages for live music and dozens of food and drink stands. About 20 galleries on and around Julia St. will be open to the public, with an after-party traditionally held at the Contemporary Arts Center.

The Dirty Linen Night (Saturday, August 10) usually follows the White Linen Night on the second Saturday in August. It’s similar in format, though looser in structure and spanning more territory. Although Dirty Linen Night does riff off White Linen Night, it wasn’t created to compete with the Warehouse District event but to promote the many galleries and shops of Royal Street. The multi-block party takes over the 200-1000 blocks of Royal Street and some cross streets and adjoining areas in the French Quarter, including Jackson Square and Dutch Alley. About 40 galleries are expected to participate again this year, plus a number of shops and restaurants.

The Red Dress Run (also on Saturday, August 10) isn’t exclusive to New Orleans, but the local participants take it up a notch by costuming on top of wearing their best and/or most outlandish red dress, regardless of gender. This is an annual fundraiser run for local charities organized by hashing groups (adults-only, non-competitive social running clubs) all over the world. They call themselves “drinking clubs with a running problem” and the local group is no exception. Any adult can participate with registration, and the run traditionally starts at Crescent Park, though the route will not be publicized until the day of the run.

The incomparable Southern Decadence festival (August 29 – September 2) is traditionally held on the Labor Day weekend. It started as a going-away party in the early 70s but now considered the fifth largest event in New Orleans. This massive four-day festival celebrates LGBT culture and attracts participants from all over the world. Just like every year, most activities will be centered in and around the French Quarter, with lots of block parties and dance parties at bars and clubs on Bourbon Street, plus two parades.

The Nightlife, Of Course

 It is no secret that New Orleans is known for its nightlife scene, and the Prince Conti Hotel puts you right by many incredible New Orleans nightlife spots, such as the bustling Harrah’s, Pat O’Brien’s, House of Blues, the legendary music spots on Frenchmen Street in the Marigny, and many more. But, really, you don’t need us to tell you that whatever floats your boat, from the dives with local beer on tap to the chef-driven destinations with exquisitely crafted cocktails served alongside small plates, you’re bound to find it in the French Quarter and nearby. (But if you do want recommendations, here are some picks for the best bars, best live music clubs, and your best-bet late-night eats in the French Quarter.)

Cooling Off in the French Quarter

Then there are these chilled-out destinations offer a refreshing refuge from the summer heat along with a shot of New Orleans flavor. The first rule of dealing with NOLA heat: Never walk anywhere without a cool beverage in hand. So, how about a daiquiri? These frozen drinks are seriously the next best thing to a portable A.C. unit. Options run the gamut from classic (the piña colada-flavored daiquiri at Big Easy Daiquiris) to craft (Cane and Table’s inspired creations), but your best bet for the beat-the-heat drinks are St. Lawrence’s seasonal versions. Past offerings include Pimm’s Cup and Peach Bellini versions. Grab a daiq and be restored!

Take the edge off with a classic martini and cool, free live jazz at The Bombay Club

— there’s a different local act each night. Best of all, you don’t have to venture outside and brave the heat to experience The Bombay Club’s unique ambiance — it’s actually attached to the Prince Conti Hotel’s back carriageway.

The Country Club requires you to venture outside the French Quarter (it’s about two miles from the Prince Conti Hotel), but it’s well worth the effort. The Bywater neighborhood standby is located in a lushly landscaped Italianate raised center-hall cottage. Enter through the breezy, fern-hung front porch to find a dining area and granite-topped bar. Beyond that lies a saltwater pool, cabana bar, hot tub, sauna, and shower area accessible via a day pass, which ranges from $10 to $15. It’s the perfect place to spend a lazy afternoon. (P.S. If it’s raining, it’s happy hour at The Country Club.)

Staying at the Prince Conti Hotel This Summer

If you are planning a trip to New Orleans this summer, make sure you book your stay at a hotel with great summer rates and close to all of the action, the Prince Conti Hotel. The Prince Conti Hotel provides you with all of the luxurious and convenient amenities you want during your stay in New Orleans, and its prime location in the French Quarter simply cannot be beat. The Prince Conti Hotel is just minutes from many great local attractions and famous sights, such as Jackson Square, Bourbon Street, and more. See you this summer!

The Top 10 Landmarks Near Our French Quarter Hotel

The Top 10 Landmarks Near Our French Quarter Hotel

When it comes to travel with a twist of magic and adventure, it doesn’t get much better than exploring the French Quarter on foot. It’s the heart and soul of New Orleans, a testament to its colorful past — a richly woven tapestry of different cultures, cuisines, musical notes, and its everlasting joie de vivre — still manifested ’round the clock in so many unique ways.

Whether you’re on a quest to sample a savory Creole dish, dance the night away to a brass band, stroll the streets to admire the exquisite wrought-iron architectural details, or take in an eclectic street performance — this one-of-a-kind place has them in spades and pretty much around every corner.

While it’s easy to come up with a longer list of must-see landmarks in a city this old and colorful, here are our top 10 recommendations, all located within walking distance from each other in the French Quarter. There’s only one exception — Frenchmen Street is located in Faubourg Marigny, right outside the French Quarter.

1. Jackson Square (751 Decatur Street)

This timeless landmark is located in the heart of French Quarter. Known since the 18th century as Place d’Armes, it was renamed in honor of Andrew Jackson following the 1815 Battle of New Orleans. Jackson’s bronze statue is the focal point of the square, surrounded by the lavish flora and facing the Mississippi River.

Jackson Square is also a host to the open-air artist market and performance space, with local art displayed along the fence. You can have your sketch done, dance to a brass band, or have your fortune told. Carriage rides are offered in front of the square. When you cross the street to the riverside, you’ll find the French Market, Cafe du Monde, and Shops at Jax Brewery.

2. St. Louis Cathedral (615 Pere Antoine Alley)

St. Louis Cathedral is the oldest continuously active Roman Catholic Cathedral in the United States. It stands between its two historic neighbors, the Cabildo and the Presbytere, overlooking Jackson Square and the block-long row of the Pontalba Buildings. St. Louis Cathedral is one of the most instantly recognizable buildings in the world, its famous steeples showing up on many a postcard and in quite a few films.

The Cathedral-Basilica of St. Louis King of France was built in 1724 and had been rebuilt twice after a hurricane and a fire. It was dedicated in 1794 and has enjoyed an illustrious and eventful history. One of its most famous caretakers was Pere Antoine, a popular Capuchin priest who had been pastor of the Cathedral from 1785 to 1790 and again from 1795 to the time of his death in 1829.

You can check out the Cathedral’s stunning interior during its hours of operation, attend a mass or a music concert. If you’re just passing by, depending on time of day, you may get to hear its bell or witness an occasional wedding party spilling out of the Cathedral, followed by a second line.

3. The Cabildo and the Presbytere (701 & 751 Chartres St., Jackson Square)

General admission to either: $6

Did you know that the 1803 Louisiana Purchase was signed at the Cabildo? This historic building served as the seat of government during the Spanish colonial rule, and was built to replace the building claimed by the fire in 1794. Standing tall right next to St. Louis Cathedral, the Cabildo is now part of the Louisiana State Museum. It houses such precious artifacts as a painting of Marie Laveau by Frank Schneider; a self-portrait by Julien Hudson, an antebellum artist and free man of color; and Napoleon’s death mask, one of only four in the world.

On the other side of St. Louis cathedral is the Presbytere, built in 1791 in the style to match the Cabildo. It’s called “Presbytere” because it was built on the site of one, which served as a residence for Capuchin monks. The building served as a courthouse in the late 19th century and is now also part of the Louisiana State Museum, just like the Cabildo.

The Presbytere currently houses two permanent exhibits. The magnificent “Mardi Gras: It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana” tells the story of the Carnival traditions in Louisiana, including Cajun Courir de Mardi Gras, Zulu coconut throws, 19th century Rex ball costumes, and much more. “The Living with Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond” exhibit documents the natural disaster, its aftermath, and the ongoing recovery with interactive displays and artifacts.

4. French Market (2 French Market Place)

French Market was founded in 1791 as a Native American trading post and has been operating continually since, making it the oldest public market in the country. Similar in structure to a traditional European market, this open-air mall covers roughly five blocks, from Cafe du Monde on Decatur St. across from Jackson Square to the daily flea market at the end of Esplanade Avenue. Many retail shops and restaurants surround it in every direction. The flea market area hosts dozens of local artisans, plus vendors from all over the world. You’ll find souvenirs, handmade masks and jewelry, t-shirts, music, and more.

French Market also includes a small pedestrian plaza on Dumaine and St. Phillip streets called Dutch Alley. The food stands at the Farmers Market Pavilion offer a slew of spices, produce and local food that is uniquely New Orleans — from pralines to oysters to the beignet mix or the hot sauce you’d want to take home. The Farmers Market also hosts an annual Creole Tomato Festival to celebrate its harvest.

5. The Riverfront (1 Toulouse Street)

You can access the mile-long riverfront very easily from the Jackson Square area. There you will find grassy Woldenberg Park and a walkway called the Moonwalk, named after the former New Orleans mayor Maurice “Moon” Landrieu.

The Woldenberg Park is a popular spot to watch the 4th of July fireworks. It also hosts one of the largest stages during the annual French Quarter Festival, which takes place in the spring.

Stroll along the Moonwalk to view public art, like the Holocaust Memorial, and to watch the boats go by. The riverwalk is also home to two popular family-friendly attractions, the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas and the Entergy IMAX Theater.

6. Bourbon Street, French Quarter

That much is true: Bourbon Street is home to one of the wildest nightly street parties in the country. It’s well known for its karaoke and burlesque clubs, bars that never seem to close, and crowds milling about round the clock. This endless party vibe makes Bourbon Street a great destination for your bachelor party, a girls’ night out, spring break, a couple’s getaway — and any other cause for celebration.

It is also one of the oldest streets in the country, a vivid example of Spanish colonial architecture dating back to 1798 and steeped in history, magic and legends. It’s also home to the city’s most iconic destinations like Galatoire’s and The Old Absinthe House. One of the best jazz clubs in the country, if not the world, also has a Bourbon Street address. Fritzel’s European Jazz Pub is located in a historic 1831 building and hosts live, traditional jazz performances nightly, attracting jazz aficionados from all over the globe.

7. Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop (941 Bourbon Street)

This ancient, at least by North American standards, bar is housed in a Creole cottage on the corner of Bourbon and St. Philip streets. Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop was built between 1722 and 1732, and it’s said to be the oldest structure used as a bar in the U.S. It’s also said to have been used by the infamous Lafitte Brothers, Jean and Pierre, as a base for their smuggling operation in Barataria, operating as a facade for the privateers. We won’t likely know the truth beyond the legend, but the bar is dripping in magic and history, making is a popular destination for locals and visitors alike.

8. Old Ursuline Convent (1100 Chartres Street)

$8 general admission

The Old Ursuline Convent was built in 1752, which makes it the oldest surviving example of the French colonial period in the country, circa Louis XV. The building has first served as a convent for the Ursuline nuns, and then, as centuries ticked on, it had been, at some point: a school, an archbishop’s and priests’ residence, archdiocesan offices/archives, and is now part of the Catholic Cultural Heritage Center of the Archdiocese of New Orleans. Its museum is open for self-guided tours.

9. Royal Street, French Quarter

Only one block away, running parallel to Bourbon Street, Royal Street presents a very different scene — a mix of performance art, live music on the corners, eclectic art galleries, funky boutiques, and upscale antique shops. The French Quarter part of Royal Street stretches for 13 blocks, from Esplanade Avenue to Canal Street, and the stretch between St. Louis and St. Ann streets is a pedestrian mall closed to traffic from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.

The scenic street is also known for its wrought-iron balconies and other charming architectural details and lush courtyards, including those featured by the street’s many restaurants. Consider having a cochon de lait in Cafe Amelie’s well-appointed courtyard, or Bananas Foster in Brennan’s stunning outdoor seating area.

Among the notable art galleries are Harouni, 933 Royal St., featuring the artist’s own work; and George Rodrique Studios, 730 Royal St., with his ubiquitous Blue Dog paintings on display.

As for shopping for antiques, from the exquisite chandeliers to rare 17th century furniture to fine art and jewelry, Royal Street also got you covered. M.S. Rau Antiques, 630 Royal St., for instance, is considered one of the best destinations in the world for antique shopping.

10. Frenchmen Street, Marigny

Frenchmen Street is a three-block area with one of the best and most densely packed live-music venues and restaurants in the city. It’s located in Faubourg Marigny, right next to the French Quarter, featuring more than 20 bars and clubs, plus a night art market, a smattering of diverse restaurants, and live music on street, especially at night. Jazz, brass, funk, DJs — you name it — and it’s playing on the corner somewhere on Frenchmen.

Some of the city’s best clubs are located on Frenchmen and offer live music seven nights a week, day and night. The Maison, for example, has three floors and a packed late-night show calendar, but also a lively Sunday jazz brunch. Dragon’s Den offers a diverse and eclectic mix of music on its two live music stages, plus the lure of a courtyard and a balcony for a more relaxed experience. Marigny Brasserie’s outdoor seating is as elegant as it is perfect for people-watching. Three Muses and Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro are the dinner-and-a-show kind of places that focus on Creole and regional cooking, and D.B.A.’s roster of the world-famous musicians who have played there is legendary.

For smaller venues and more intimate ambiance, you can try The Spotted Cat or the cozy, divey Apple Barrel. Finally, top off all the blues and funk with Adolfo’s Creole Italian cooking, from a tiny old-school restaurant directly above the Apple Barrel.

When you’re done with the hustle and the bustle of the French Quarter and the Marigny, come have a handcrafted cocktail at the Bombay Club or a bite to eat at Cafe Conti at the Prince Conti Hotel. Although it’s located in the heart of the historical French Quarter, just steps away from its most exciting sights and destinations, Prince Conti offers a quiet respite from it all, an oasis with an elegant yet relaxed vibe.

What to Do in the French Quarter in April

What to Do in the French Quarter in April

Don’t spread this around too much, but April might just be the best time to visit New Orleans. The city has recovered from its massive Mardi Gras hangover, crawfish season is in full, spicy swing and the weather is just about as perfect as it gets, with average highs hovering in the mid-70s. If that’s not incentive enough, April is a month jam-packed with music, food, parades, festivals…you know, all the stuff that makes New Orleans so New Orleans. Best of all? You don’t have to venture outside the French Quarter to enjoy the best the city has to offer, and many of these events don’t cost a dime. Just bring a sense of joie de vivre and let the good times roll.

Jazz in the Park Treme Crab Festival – April 1-2

Situated on Rampart Street, which forms the French Quarter’s northern boundary, Armstrong Park (901 N. Rampart St.) is a shady, sprawling urban park with water features and a statue tribute to Satchmo–and in April, it hosts the first annual Treme Crab Festival. You’ll find music by Rebirth Brass Band, Little Freddie King, Treme Brass Band and more at the free weekend events. And did we mention food? The festival is a tribute to the Louisiana’s most delicious saltwater crustacean. Enjoy crabs blended into dip by Chef Don Harding, boiled by Louisiana Direct Seafood, folded into ravioli by Voleo’s Seafood Restaurant…the list goes on.

French Quarter Festival – April 6-9

It’s the largest free music festival in the South, when more than 1,700 musicians take over 23 stages scattered throughout the Vieux Carre and commence to rock out. There’s a preponderance of jazz, zydeco, New Orleans funk, brass bands… pretty much every form of music native to Louisiana and the delta gets a chance to shine in front of more than 760,000 attendees. Wear sunscreen and comfortable shoes, because you’ll be doing a lot of walking from stage to stage (not to mention dancing).

Crescent City Classic – April 15

Yes, the Crescent City Classic is a 10k that attracts top athletes from around the world, but it’s so much more than a road race. Even if your idea of a workout is walking from Cafe du Monde to Pat O’ Brien’s, you owe it to yourself to check out the race, festival, music and people who have made the Crescent City Classic a New Orleans institution for 37 years. You can run, walk, dance or push a stroller down all or part of its scenic route, which loops from the Superdome, through the Quarter and up Esplanade before ending in a party in City Park. Or you can sit on the sidelines, cheer on the participants and ask yourself how it’s possible for so many people to run while drinking and wearing full costumes. Either way, the Crescent City Classic is a spectacle not to be missed.

Easter Parades – April 16

Easter is a time for celebration, chocolate bunnies and church services…but in New Orleans, it’s decidedly over the top. Wear your finest pastels, florals, seersucker and hats (the bigger the better) and you’ll fit right in at the city’s three Easter parades. They kick off at 9:45 a.m., when The Historic French Quarter Easter Parade rolls from Antoine’s Restaurant (713 St. Louis St.) to St. Louis Cathedral for 11 a.m. mass. After that, things take a turn for the campy with the Chris Owens French Quarter parade, which celebrates Bourbon Street’s reigning queen (and the hottest septuagenarian to rock sequined bodysuits since Cher). It rolls from Canal and Bourbon streets at 1 p.m. Finally, the Gay Easter Parade closes down the celebrations at 4:30, with floats, throws and dancers galore. Celebrate good times, come on!

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival – April 28-May 7

If you’re coming to New Orleans during the last weekend in April, you probably already know about the granddaddy of all music festivals, Jazz Fest. From contemporary arena-filling rock stars (Kings of Leon Maroon 5) and rap gods (Snoop Dogg, Pitbull) to pop princesses (Meghan Trainor, Lorde) and living legends (Stevie Wonder, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers), the festival covers every musical base as it takes over the Fair Grounds Race Course (1751 Gentilly Blvd.). And of course, there’s a hearty assortment of Louisiana acts at the stages. Don’t leave without feasting on food as well as music…crawfish bread, po-boys, muffalettas, boiled seafood, red beans and rice and more are all for sale. Pro tip: rent a bike to cruise right up to the gates–it’s an easy 3.4-mile ride–and wear rubber boots and a poncho if it rains. (You’ll thank us when the dirt race tracks turn to knee-deep mud.)